In the barber chair last week: I told my hairdresser that I got my certificate as an Emotion Focussed Therapist. And that I was looking for another intercultural couple with marital problems to practice with. “Oh my parents!” she exclaimed!  

She is the child of intercultural parents and always felt different from her Dutch nieces and nephews. She didn’t get fancy expensive gifts. She looked and felt very different. Her father was called ‘black whopper’. By the Dutch in-laws! That all hurts terribly. No wonder she had a very hard time in her youth. The parents struggled among themselves, exacerbated by the concern for their children. 

In any case, I see it all around me: children of mixed parents often struggle with identity questions. This deserves attention, not only for the children themselves, but also for the parents and what it means for their relationship. And vice versa: if your parents can’t agree because they are so different, what does that do to you as a child? 

Do you recognize this in your intercultural community? I’d love to hear more about it! 

Mail us if you want to talk further. office@icpnetwork.nl 

Corina Mushikangondo van der Laan has been married to Claude, a Congolese pastor, for 17 years and has lived abroad for 12 years. She is training for emotion focused therapy and will soon start guiding intercultural and migrant couples in ICP municipalities.